Honest History: History in secondary schools Part I: Honest History Factsheet

 

History in secondary schools Part I: Honest History Factsheet, Honest History, 8 November 2013

In this article we have matched sections of Australian Curriculum History Year 9 against sections of the Honest History website which is to be launched 7 November 2013. In each case the extract from the Curriculum is followed by the approximate number of relevant bibliographical items uploaded into sections of the website as at 20 October 2013.

Under the Resources heading on the website there are 16 sections altogether. There is an outline of these sections in our earlier newsletters, here (scroll down) and here (scroll down). When the site is launched it will have approximately 500 unique items under the Resources heading with most items relevant to more than one section.

The items describe books, articles, websites, broadcasts and other sources. They usually include author, publisher and a comment or extract, sometimes an extended one. The longest items are about 600 words. The aim is to give readers a good idea of what each item contains so they can proceed further via the links provided. A typical item is here.

We are uploading items progressively and will continue to do so after the site launches. We will welcome suggestions from users for new items to be included or for corrections and comments to be added to existing items (use our Comments facility for this).

The Honest History concept is built around the idea of ‘Not only Anzac but also [lots of other strands] in Australian history’. The balance of items on the site reflects this, as the figures below indicate.

Australian Curriculum History Year 9: Making a nation

‘The extension of settlement, including the effects of contact (intended and unintended) between European settlers in Australia and Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander peoples’

  • There are approximately 35 relevant items in the Strands of Australian history, The land we live in, People like us and The sweat of our brows sections of the Honest History website

‘The experiences of non-Europeans in Australia prior to the 1900s (such as the Japanese, Chinese, South Sea Islanders, Afghans)’

  • Approximately 25 relevant items (Strands of Australian history, People like us, The sweat of our brows, Getting on with the world)

‘Living and working conditions in Australia around the turn of the twentieth century (that is 1900)’

  • Approximately 50 relevant items (Strands of Australian history, People like us, Ruling ourselves, The sweat of our brows, Learning and improving)

‘Key events and ideas in the development of Australian self-government and democracy, including women’s voting rights’

  • Approximately 25 relevant items (Strands of Australian history, People like us, Ruling ourselves, The sweat of our brows)

‘Legislation 1901-1914, including the Harvester Judgment, pensions, and the Immigration Restriction Act’

  • Approximately 30 relevant items (Strands of Australian history, People like us, Ruling ourselves, The sweat of our brows, Getting on with the world)

Australian Curriculum History Year 9: World War I

‘Students investigate key aspects of World War I and the Australian experience of the war, including the nature and significance of the war in world and Australian history.’

World War I (1914-1918)

‘An overview of the causes of World War I and the reasons why men enlisted to fight in the war’

  • There are approximately 45 relevant items in the Anzac analysed, Australia’s war history and Reality of war sections of the Honest History website

‘The places where Australians fought and the nature of warfare during World War I, including the Gallipoli campaign’

  • Approximately 30 relevant items (Anzac analysed, Australia’s war history, Reality of war)

‘The impact of World War I, with a particular emphasis on Australia (such as the use of propaganda to influence the civilian population, the changing role of women, the conscription debate)’

  • Approximately 40 relevant items (Australia’s war history, Home front, Aftermath)

‘The commemoration of World War I, including debates about the nature and significance of the Anzac legend’

  • Approximately 130 relevant items (Anzac analysed)

 

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